Coronavirus: second post

We’ve been home bound since early March.  Approaching three months.  It’s been an amazing time.  And although states have begun to “open up” there is a spike in infections and some return to lock down.  Social distancing, masks, and hand washing could continue for months.  Being retired our lives have changed but no where as drastically as for the millions of unemployed, those in poverty, homeless, in nursing homes. Their conditions and stories are tragic, frightening.

The national political divide is increasingly disturbing.  I want to turn off the news but feel obligated to stay somewhat informed and aware of what’s happening.  The Trump administration’s response from my perspective has been inadequate and at times ridiculous. I sometimes try to pull back and not be so critical but then Trump will do or say something that I find absurd.  His behavior and decisions are consistently driven by his vision of re-election in November.  I’ll avoid the specifics.

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Our lifestyle change does make us appreciate the basics.  It was  a chilly wet spring, so building a fire in the wood stove Continued to be a treat,  not just in February and March but as late as May.  When it’s warm and the sun shine I totally enjoy my walks on the canal.  Just sitting on the deck, the back yard or front porch is a delight.  The chirping birds and budding trees. It’s not easy but I am trying to keep up with the garden.  There are more greens from seed than we can eat.   Tomatoes, peppers and eggplants are growing big.  I was hoping Paul who cuts the grass would weed the back garden.  He did and I sowed cucumber, bean and squash seed.

Mornings until about one when we have lunch (lots of garden salads now) are devoted to the daily routines, laundry, cleaning up a bit, walking, minor projects, sometimes cooking.  In the afternoon I read, several books each month.  I’ve blogged some but not all weeks.   I do find writing, if only for myself,  a release.  Anxiety and minor depression has been limited, usually associated with the news or my feeling of helplessness.  I don’t like to be out of control.  I have read that it’s on the rise.

APTOPIX Minneapolis Police Death

Coronavirus news this past month was outpaced by the protests, rioting and looting in cities across the country over the death of Floyd George in Minneapolis.  The protests started there but spread rapidly. Philadelphia was a battleground of personal interest.  I remember the aftermath of the King assassination here.  The current pattern seemed to be that peaceful protests in the afternoon and early evening turn violent later when there were been curfews and strong police action.  There were suspicions that the right or left wing (Trump accused Antifa) was responsible for the violence.  We may never know?  So much of this recalls the 1960s and early 1970s when one tragedy, crisis, frightening and saddening event followed another.  The protests seemed to be youth, in some cities Whites  (even more)  and Blacks.  Combine outrage against police brutality, our long history of racism. the lock down, unemployment, poverty and hunger and our current nightly news hasn’t been much of a surprise. Trump’s response to the protests became increasingly militant.  Enough said.

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Its sometimes hard to believe it’s July.  Retired for six years.  Some have been better than others. It’s hard to predict what lies ahead.  Jenny decided to keep the Cape Cod reservations.  If things seem totally safe maybe we will go but as of now that doesn’t seem a strong possibility. This may be the first year we spend the total summer in Yardley.  There is plenty of cleaning, organizing, and getting rid of stuff that we need to do. We can take day trips, enjoy sitting on the deck and yard.  I do need to break from the current routine.  The beauty of summer has always been the break with routine.  I’m thinking but don’t have a good plan yet.  As Thoreau wrote, “How deep the ruts of tradition and conformity.”

I’ll try to get out of the rut and find that mix of tradition and change, the old and new, familiar and unfamiliar, that has characterized my better days, best summers and most exciting trips.  A bit of serendipity never hurt.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Coronavirus, first post

View from my chair and deck.

We’ve been taking one day at a time since early March.  On March 9 I had an appointment in Philadelphia with Kovell. “Could he open the fistula?”  I didn’t want an abscess, fever, ER.  But he said he couldn’t feel anything.  Call if abscess developed.  Later that week we went to the State Store since they were scheduled to close.  And Diane made a trip to McCaffrey’s one day at six — seniors only.  That was our last trips into stores.

Diane walks Nala every day, going to Washington Crossing or some other area.  For weeks we’ve been warned to keep six foot distance and more recently to wear a face mask. NJ Parks have recently closed due to the number of people.   I was Canal walking until rain, clouds, damp chilly weather and upset stomach keep me in for a week.  Yesterday I took a short walk to the Mary Yardley footbridge.  A week off is not good.  Also enjoyed sitting on the deck in the sun several days.  Otherwise we’ve been inside.

We bagan to place some orders online.  Olive oil from Amazon, wine from Washington Crossing Vinyards, cheese from Wisconsin Cheese Company, chocolates from Sweet Ashley. Our neighbor Kurt brought us milk and later seafood from Trader Joe’s where he works.  Diane tried a Whole Foods/Amazon Prime food delivery but could never get a shipping date.  Then we discovered Shady Brook Farm was doing curbside pick up. We ordered some meat, fruits and vegetables.  The main things we didn’t get were Greggstown pot pies and sausage.  Could do a curbside with them.  Organnons on 413 and NonSuch Farms also have curbside when needed.  Also waiting for flour from King Arthur and toilet paper from Amazon.  There are a few other things we could order online.  And I’ve stocked up on pills and supplement.  We let boxes sit for a day or so and wash up after opening. That’s shopping.

I’ve made cornbread, biscuits, yogurt but haven’t baked bread yet.  I should.  Diane made a pan cake with chocolate drops.  Very tasty.  And we’ve stretched our meals, cauliflower sauce on pasta for several days, Cod in rice and vegetables several days.  We probably have food for two weeks.

Several days ago the sun came out in the late afternoon and I planted seed in two of the eight raised beds — peas, kale, lettuce, radish, fennel, arugula.  Unfortunately I forget to buy spinach.  Four of the beds got a fresh filling of leaf mulch.  I don’t know if I’ll be getting it for the others. Neighbor Chris will have some plants for sale and I think nurseries will be open or have curbside.  Paul Ahearn is expected today to cut grass.

Early on in our quarantine we accepted delivery of a new couch and chair.  Some concern about strangers in the house but we disinfected after they left. Unfortunately for me the chair is not as comfortable as the old one and I spend hours every day sitting in it.  Our other surprise visitors were from Bristol Fuel.  Our water died on a Saturday. Sunday I called and Dave Burton stopped to check on his way to Bristol.  Repair or new heater?  We opted for new and Dave returned later with a helper and installed a new heater.  More disinfection.

People contact is important.  I call my sisters every other day, Pagliones, and have made called to Franny Profy, Eleanor Osborne, Jerry Alonzo, Mike Honan, Taylor’s and emails to others.  We talk daily to Jenny and yesterday called the kids on Face Time.  Good to see them if only on an I Pad.  Might do that with others.  Unfortunately my phone took a soaking in the washing machine; still drying out. Diane used Zoom for her book club.

Afternoons I read and usually nap.  Until last week I was building a daily fire, then just on chilly days.  They provide light as well as warmth and I still might fire up if it rains or is just dismal.  Finished a biography of Edison and “Cooked” by Michael Pollen.  Finishing up “ East Hill Farm,” 1960s NY retreat of Alan Ginsberg and friends and “Circling the Sun,” a novel about Beryl Markham growing up and living in Kenya.  Brought down other books from my reread library.

Ive listened to a few records, but not enough and watched several movies — “Marianne and Leonard” and “A Beautiful Day in the Neighborhood” during the day. “Life with Father” and “Charade” at night on the I-Pad.

We’ve watched the numbers climb.  Over 10,000 deaths in the US; 160 in PA; 17 in Bucks.  The epicenter has moved from Washington State, California to New York, particularly NYC.  Governor Andrew Cuomo has emerged as a strong Democratic voice to counter President Trump.  Stay-at-home orders exist in most states until the end of April.  Trump’s response has turned a daily press conference into a political ad.  I’ve tried to stopped watching them but read too many articles and reports.  More about that later.

On Friday April 3 I could feel the fistula developing into a abscess.  A fever wouldn’t be far behind.  I squeezed and squeezed until it broke open and began to drain. I called Koganski who said no antibiotic needed if there was no fever and it was draining. The thought of visiting the ER was frightening.

Now time for a late breakfast. Waffles and homemade apple butter and yogurt.

 

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